A list of Must Try dishes in Hai Phong

For each region there are specialties with their own recipe. This is also the case of Hai Phong, a port city located about one hundred kilometers from Hanoi. Yet the street food in Hai Phong is far from identical to that of Hanoi, Saigon or other areas. Together, let’s discover what makes it so special by citing its most famous dishes. #MustSeeInVietnam Editor

In the northern city of Hai Phong, from the early morning to late at night, visitors can enjoy a variety of food and drinks.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

In recent years, food tours have played a major role in Hai Phong tourism. The Hai Phong Department of Tourism has released a Hai Phong food tour map, so that tourists and residents can easily find and enjoy local food. In the photo is Cat Bi market, one of the destinations on the Hai Phong food tour map.

Duy Tung, 28, born and raised in Hai Phong, is passionate about the cuisine in this port city. Tung often explores famous eateries in the city to introduce them to other people.

“Coming to Hai Phong, even in a small alley or a roadside market, visitors can still find small vendors selling foods and drinks. Besides the three main meals, the locals have the habit of having snacks,” Tung said.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

According to Tung, when you start a food tour in the morning, you can choose a true Hai Phong-style breakfast with a bowl of crab noodle soup. They are sold all over the city, at the beginning of any alley, or in restaurants such as Bao Yen restaurant at 29/31 Nguyen Binh Khiem street, or Lach Tray Crab Noodle Soup at 48 Lach Tray street, lane 195 Cau Dat.

Tung said that the crab noodle soup sold at the beginning of the small alley had the most Hai Phong characteristics, as they were sold for locals. The red rice noodles are cooked in sweet crab broth, served with shrimp, thin slices of meat, pork rolls in wild betel leaves, and crispy fried pork fat. Restaurants usually cater to more tourists. “Even if you are a tourist, you should try a bowl of crab noodle soup sold in small alleys. It has the traditional taste with a cheap price, only about VND25,000 to 30,000 (US$1.06-1.27),” Tung said.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

If you don’t like soup, you can have bread sticks with fatty pate filled with chi chuong – a special kind of Hai Phong chili sauce, and a cup of coconut coffee to cool your mouth down after eating the spicy bread sticks. 

Places where you can enjoy such bread sticks include Old Lady at 57A Le Loi street or Spicy Bread and Thai Tea at 37 Dinh Tien Hoang street. However, visitors need to queue and buy before 8 in the morning because these shops are quite famous, and only sell a limited amount of bread per day. “If you want to buy a huge number of bread sticks as a gift, you have to order 1 to 2 hours in advance because the bread is only made per order,” Tung noted.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

Other dishes sold in the afternoon are usually considered snacks, so people can still have dinner afterwards. You can choose a plate of banh beo – steamed rice cakes – with minced meat mixed with pepper, onions and sweet and sour fish sauce.

Visitors can go to Cat Bi market, Dong Quoc Binh market or Luong Van Can market to enjoy these dishes. These are the famous markets of Hai Phong. They’re known for offering a variety of cuisines and reasonable prices. These markets have separate areas for diners, allowing visitors to enjoy many dishes without having to move much. Even when you wander in off the street, you can still find and enjoy these snacks.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

Sui din is a dish suitable for cold weather. This is a glutinous rice dumpling filled with green bean or black sesame, eaten with hot ginger water, and a pinch of shredded coconut sprinkled on top. Famous shops that sell this dish are Co Ut at 163 Cau Dat street, shop at 49 Dinh Tien Hoang street, and shop at 34 Ky Dong street. “Even though they are only street food vendors, they are always full of customers, especially on cold days,” Tung said.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

In the evening, there are many delicious dishes, the most outstanding of which are snail dishes. This is a great choice for travelers who’d like to take their time enjoying their food. There are many types of snails in Hai Phong, such as sea snail, nail snail or wool snail. They are cooked similarly with Saigonese style, but less sweet to suit the northern taste.

Some famous snail restaurants are Tuyet snail in the alley next to 27 Le Loi Street, Online Snail at 52 Dan Lap Street, and Huong snail at 274 Hang Kenh Street. “These snail restaurants are always my group’s favorite place to gather on the weekend because there are all kinds of fresh snails that are cooked into many dishes with strong seasoning and spices, just like the character of Hai Phong people,” Tung commented.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

There are other cuisines that can be enjoyed at any time of the day, such as chrysanthemum tea. The tea has a bit of a bitter taste on the tip of the tongue, but then soon will become sweet when coming down to the throat, due to the mixture of licorice and fresh kumquat. Chrysanthemum tea vendors are concentrated on Phan Boi Chau and Minh Khai streets.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

This is stir-fried gia be – a species of mollusk, which is cooked with vinegar, fish sauce, turmeric powder and arrowroot powder. Gia be has a flattened oval shape with two thin shells. The meat in the middle is similar to clams and mussels. 

“Enjoying this dish requires patience. If you want to eat the meat part, you need to separate the shell of each one. You can eat the meat part along with the separate leg part. This is just a fun snack dish, you won’t be full eating this,” Tung said. 

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

Coconut milk coffee is made from coffee powder mixed with coconut milk and condensed milk, then whisked to form a paste. Depending on the preferences of the customer, a variety of toppings can be added such as glass jelly, tapioca pearls, fresh shredded coconut, and dried coconut chips.

As Tung said, this drink has a slightly bitter taste of coffee combined with the sweetness of coconut milk and the aroma of condensed milk, which makes it easy to drink as it is not bitter nor too sweet. In Hai Phong, the most famous coffee shops that sell this drink is Co Hanh Coconut Coffee at 148 Luong Khanh Thien street, Ms Hang at 124a Lam Son street, Le Chan district, and many other coffee shops across the city.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

The fermented pork roll sold at the Ba Cu vendor is firm and crunchy. Each bowl usually has two spring rolls and is eaten with vinegar fish sauce. A special feature of the dish is a large basket of fresh herbs. You can find this cuisine at the intersection of Ton That Thuyet and Phan Boi Chau Streets.

Hai Phong food tour: A list of must try dishes

Banh duc tau, or steamed rice cake, is a dish originating from China, and is now a popular snack in Hai Phong. The steamed rice cake is cut into small pieces, adding toppings such as papaya or kohlrabi, shrimp and pork belly.

Sharing more about Hai Phong cuisine, Tung said: “Hai Phong cuisine is so diverse that it is rare to find somewhere else with a similar cuisine culture. Hai Phong has strong ethnic dishes. Also, the city is adjacent to the sea, so there is an abundant source of seafood. Thanks to Hai Phong port, the locals have the opportunity to try many new dishes from other places, and through the process of changing and renovating the flavors to suit its local tastes, the food has become a specialty of Hai Phong.”

By Sang Sang, Duy Tung for E.VnExpress.net

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Hidden Treasures of Hanoi : Pham Thi Noi’s steamed rice cake eatery – Savory steamed rice cake sold for more than 30 years

30 years… it’s almost half the life of this passionate entrepreneur concocting for us this delicious dish which over the years with other chefs have built the gastronomic reputation of HANOI. Just a word before you keep having a Good Sunday: Pham Thi Noi Steamed Rice Cake Restaurant is a must when visiting Hanoi. #MustSeeInVietnam Editor

Every afternoon, it is common to see Hanoians wandering into small alleys in search of snacks.

Many of these snacks have become the capital’s must-try street food, such as nem chua ran – deep fried pork rolls, oc nong – steamed snails, banh duc nong – savory steamed rice cake, and many others. Among the savory rice flour pudding eateries in Hanoi, it is impossible not to mention Noi’s on Le Ngoc Han Street.

The small eatery is located deep inside an alley, where customers can sit inside or outside the house. Visitors can always see Pham Thi Noi, owner of the restaurant, quickly scooping up steamed rice cakes, pouring hot fish sauce into a bowl, and then carefully sprinkling some chopped scallions and herbs on top of the dish.

Photo by Xuan Phuong

A sign for Pham Thi Noi’s steamed rice cake eatery at the entrance of an alley at No. 8 Le Ngoc Han Street. Photo by Xuan Phuong

“I have been selling this dish for more than 30 years,” she said. “I used to sell it on the sidewalk, but later I moved into this alley. I can’t count how many servings I sell every day.”

Banh duc, or rice cake, was originally a dish of the poor. People would just eat it on its own, or dip it in fish sauce. Later on, the locals modified the dish, adding many other ingredients to turn the simple rice cake into a favorite snack of Hanoi. Noi said that the savory steamed rice cake recipe was passed down to her by her family. The main ingredient of the cake is rice flour, which is cooked until it becomes thick and viscous.

The topping is made from ground pork and stir-fried wood ear mushroom. While the regular glutinous rice cake can be enjoyed simply by dipping it in tuong ban, a fermented soybean dipping paste, the savory steamed rice cake is eaten with many more toppings.

Photo by Xuan Phuong

A bowl of steamed rice cake with toppings including cilantro, fried tofu and minced pork. Photo by Xuan Phuong

When the customers order, Noi will put ingredients into the bowl, the steamed rice cake at the bottom, then wood ear mushroom, ground pork, hot fish sauce, and fried shallots and green onions on top. The sauce is cooked from bones and fish sauce, creating a sweet and subtle flavor. In each bowl, there are a few pieces of deep-fried tofu as well. The steamed rice cake has a soft and gooey texture, mixed with the savory taste of the meat and wood ear mushroom, plus the aroma of green onions, creating a harmonious flavor.

Despite being hidden deep inside an alley, Noi’s place is always filled with customers. This cuisine is just a fun late afternoon snack, ideal for those moments of wandering around the street.

For more than 30 years, Noi’s savory steamed rice cake has become a flavor associated with many people’s childhood. Many diners have frequented Noi’s place for the past few decades.

Nguyen Khanh, who now frequents the shop with his wife, said that he has been eating here since he was a child. To date, savory steamed rice cake is still his first choice whenever he thinks of an afternoon snack.

In the years since Noi first began making steamed rice cake, a few changes have been made to the recipe, such as adding more meat, spices and fried tofu. However, the dish still retains its traditional taste.

Photo by Xuan Phuong

Pham Thi Noi by two pots of rice cake and sauce. Photo by Xuan Phuong

Each bowl of savory steamed rice cake costs VND20,000 (US$0.84). The affordable price is also the reason why this place attracts many diners. Noi said that the customers coming to the shop are quite diverse, from local regulars who have been eating here for several decades to domestic and foreign tourists.

Noi no longer just has savory steamed rice cakes on her menu. She now offers a variety of other dishes, including snail noodle soup, mixed red rice noodle with crab paste, and crab noodle soup.

The place is open from 8 a.m.in the morning to midnight, and is located at 8 Le Ngoc Han street.

By Xuan Phuong for E.VnExpress.net

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How to explore the floating wonderland of Lan Ha Bay, Vietnam, by Charlotte Wigram-Evans

Good Saturday morning! I am doing something different this morning by suggesting that you read an article published in National Geographic about one of our magnificent territories. #MustSeeInVietnam Editor

In Vietnam’s far north, Lan Ha Bay appears like a lost world — home to floating villages, sea eagles skimming the waves and hundreds of limestone karsts rising from the water.

Leaning over the rails of the Dora Cruise boat, I find myself drinking in the scene before me. Shimmering through the haze, row upon row, are giant-like mythical creatures torn straight from the pages of a fairytale. Slowly, it’s clear, these are the towering karsts of Lan Ha Bay coming into focus, Mother Nature adding brush strokes to her canvas. Plants cascade down from the rock face, greens mixing with the greys and silvers of the limestone beneath, while butterflies flap lazily among little white flowers just visible through the foliage. Passengers and crew are dumbstruck, but, as my gaze roves around the rest of the bay, I notice something else: there’s not another ship in sight.

In comparison with the booming tourist trade in neighbouring Ha Long Bay, where dozens of ships ply the waters daily and where travellers are surrounded by so many boats that the megaliths somehow lose their magic, Lan Ha Bay is the area’s quieter alternative. Very few cruise companies have permission to sail here, so for most of the journey, I’m sharing the water with a handful of fishing boats, dwarfed in size as they sail past the stone giants.

“Families live on board for many weeks at a time,” the ship’s guide, Dien, reveals, waving to a rickety boat that bobs past, crab baskets hanging precariously from the back. “They won’t return to their village until all their nets are full.” A family of three returns his greeting, a little girl no older than six grinning up at us, her eyes twinkling mischievously.

Unlike Ha Long Bay, much of which is protected as a UNESCO-designated site and where fishing is strictly forbidden, Lan Ha Bay is home to hundreds of people, most of whom live in floating villages and depend on the sea for survival. “The goddess of the ocean is the most important deity to this community,” Dien tells me. “They depend on her for safe passage, for a good catch and to protect their families. Every boat you see will have a tiny shrine inside, dedicated solely to her.” 

The fishing boat in front of us — painted in red, blue and green, with the Vietnam flag fluttering in the breeze — slowly disappears behind another limestone mountain. Life must be hard on board the tiny vessel, I think, constantly at the mercy of the elements, waiting for the sea goddess to grant a catch so bountiful one can finally return home. 

Each island in the biodiverse bay is covered in dense forest, ripe for exploration.

Each island in the biodiverse bay is covered in dense forest, ripe for exploration. 

PHOTOGRAPH BY GETTY IMAGES

Paddling between giants

The family of fishermen come to mind again as we sit down to a lunch of fluffy rice, papaya salad and grouper so fresh it must have been caught that morning. Each course is served by waiters in dinner jackets who are all so polite that I nearly find myself bowing back to them. After eating far more than is comfortable, Dien drags me down to the bottom deck to take kayaks out into the bay.

On the water, the perspective shifts and soon I’m among the karsts themselves, so close I can run my fingers across the rock. There are a thousand colours in the stone, including yellows and greens and whites and silvers. When the sun appears from behind a cloud, they shine the colour of molten steel.

“You can’t believe that nature can make this, eh?” says Dien, who seems just as enthralled despite having sailed here countless times. “It’s like big people are playing games.” And indeed, deep, vertical grooves in the rock face do look like giants have drawn their fingers down fresh clay. “There are 366 islands in this area — just imagine them bursting from the ground around 20 million years ago.”

We paddle beneath stone arches and past empty bays, pausing to watch a woman collect clams with a bucket and chisel, before heaving our kayaks onto a deserted beach. “Do you see the man in the top hat?” asks Dien, pointing at a karst to our left, “and what about that one, what shape is that?” I look at the perfectly phallus-shaped rock and pause awkwardly, wondering if that’s really what he’s getting at. “A thumb, of course!”

Back on board and wrapped in a fluffy dressing gown, I head to my room. The Dora boat is one of the newest ships in the bay, and everything sparkles. The super-king-size bed is a paradise of plump pillows and silky sheets, while my private deck stretches right to the bow of the boat, complete with sun loungers and a swinging sofa big enough for four. The bathroom is better still — it’s enormous with floor-to-ceiling windows.

Outside, the sun is setting, staining the sky a dusky pink and casting long shadows across the water. An eagle swoops past my window, skimming the waves for eels, and another lone fishing boat putters slowly past. As usual, the bay is almost completely empty of ships, and in the soupy light, the stone mountains emit a soft, golden glow — as magical as ever.

Watch fishermen navigate their daily haul from the deck of a Lan Ha cruise.

Watch fishermen navigate their daily haul from the deck of a Lan Ha cruise. 

PHOTOGRAPH BY GLYN THOMAS PHOTOGRAPHY / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

Getting there

Vietnam Airlines offers direct flights from Heathrow to Hanoi three times a week and indirect options daily, with an average flight time of 12hrs. From Hanoi, there’s a regular bus service to Ha Long Bay; from there, it’s a short ferry ride to Lan Ha Bay.

When to go

Hanoi and Lan Ha Bay are generally dry and cool (around 20C) from November to April, but summer sees highs of more than 30C, often with heavy rainfall. 

How to do it

InsideAsia Tours offers a 13-night Vietnam’s Greatest Hits trip from £1,889 per person, which includes accommodation, breakfast, a stay in Hanoi, a cruise in Lan Ha Bay, transport across Vietnam and a range of cultural experiences. International flights excluded.

Three more: alternative boat trips in Vietnam
 

Mekong River

The Mekong snakes for more than 3,500 miles, through some of Asia’s most spectacular scenery before reaching the South China Sea at the southern tip of Vietnam. To cruise its lower stretch is to witness rice paddies and remote villages, where floating markets are part of daily life. Heritage Line offers a seven-night cruise from Vietnam to Siem Reap in Cambodia.

Con Dao Islands

Sprinkled across the South China Sea, this archipelago of 16 islands is home to palm-fringed beaches, clear waters and pristine coral reefs. Asia Tours offers three-day trips, or, for a two-week odyssey, Ponant leaves Ho Chi Minh City to cruise South East Asia’s islands, stopping at Con Dao before continuing onwards to Singapore and Indonesia.  

Ninh Binh

Often referred to as Ha Long Bay on land, Ninh Binh is dominated by limestone mountains. Winding between these are canals flanked by rice paddies and frequented by birdlife. Hop in a wooden paddleboat and keep an eye out for storks picking their way through the shallows and goats wandering the shores. Indochina Junk offers a three-day cruise beginning in Bai Tu Long Bay and continuing on to Ninh Binh.

BY CHARLOTTE WIGRAM-EVANS & Published in the Cruise 2023 guide, distributed with the Jan/Feb 2023 issue of National Geographic Traveller (UK) https://www.nationalgeographic.co.uk

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National Geographic – 9 photos that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

Vietnam Lensmen show us the natural beauties of Vietnam as they feel them when taking their pictures and transmit their emotions to us. I admire these artists and thank them for creating in me a sense of wonder about what they make me discover about my Vietnam. #MustSeeInVietnam Editor

Lensman Tran Tuan Viet continued to boost his global profile by having a number of his photographs published by U.S. magazine National Geographic in 2022. 

9 photos in NatGeo that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

Featured on National Geographic’s Instagram account with 6.5 million followers on January 15, this photo shows people standing on top of Ta Xua, the 10th highest peak in Vietnam at 2,865 meters and situated between Yen Bai and Son La provinces.

By late November the temperatures here fall to 14-19 degrees Celsius during day and 9-10 degrees at night. 

The best time to see clouds there is between December and March.

“In the early mornings from October to April a sea of clouds appears in this mountainous region, creating a magical beauty,” Viet said.

9 photos in NatGeo that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

Featured by NatGeo’s photo editors on January 19, this photo captures the beauty of tea hills shrouded in thick fog in Long Coc Commune in Phu Tho Province, around 112 kilometers from Hanoi.

Long Coc has in recent years become a popular destination for photographers thanks to tea hills that resemble upturned bowls placed next to each other. 

Tea farming is one of the main sources of income in Phu Tho, a place sacred for Vietnamese as the birthplace of the nation’s mythical founders, the Hung Kings. 

9 photos in NatGeo that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

This photo in NatGeo in January shows a tourist standing inside Son Doong, the world’s largest cave, as the sun shines down.

“To take this photo, I woke up at 5 a.m., went through the usual trekking route that usually takes around 1.5 days in some four hours and waited for the first rays of sunlight to penetrate deep into the cave,” Viet said.

A four-day-three-night expedition of Son Doong Cave costs VND69.8 million (around US$3,000) but numbers are strictly limited every year. 

During the expedition, tourists can explore the cave together with an expert, see unique underground rainforests and scale the 90-meter “Great Wall of Vietnam” at the end of the cave with ropes and ladders.

They get three freshly cooked meals every day and sleep in some of the world’s greatest campsites.

9 photos in NatGeo that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

This photo, featured in May, shows a farmer cycling by a lone tree on the outskirts of Hanoi. 

Viet, who started his photography career in 2007, has won a number of top prizes in prestigious photo contests and is the only Vietnamese photographer to collaborate with National Geographic.

9 photos in NatGeo that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

A street vendor walks on Hanoi’s Ceramic Road.

The murals on the Red River dike are made from ceramic tesserae from Bat Trang village, famed for its centuries-old traditional pottery.

The photo was published on NatGeo in July. 

9 photos in NatGeo that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

Featured in August, this photo captures an aerial view of Ma Pi Leng, one of the most dangerous passes in Vietnam’s northern highlands. 

Soaring above the pass is a mountain 2,000 meters high along whose side is the Hanh Phuc (Happiness) Road connecting Ha Giang Town, Dong Van District and Meo Vac District in Ha Giang Province, around 300 kilometers (186 miles) from Hanoi and close to the China border.

Below the pass is the Nho Que River with its turquoise waters, popular for kayaking and boat tours. 

9 photos in NatGeo that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

The shot, chosen by NatGeo editors in August, shows young men lifting a teammate who hugs a wooden ball at a ball wrestling festival in Van village in the northern province of Bac Giang’s Viet Yen District.

Held from the 12th to the 14th of the fourth lunar month every four years, the festival features ancient rituals and spiritual beliefs of a wet rice civilization, with local farmers praying for bumper crops and good weather for the rice season.

In 2018 NatGeo magazine listed the festival as one of the world’s most extraordinary traditions. 

9 photos in NatGeo that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

This photo featured on NatGeo in October has a fisherman rowing his coracle to harvest seaweed called sargassum, which usually thrives in coral reefs and underwater rocks and emerges from the water surface once fully grown, during the dry season between May and July.

Viet took the photo in Hon Kho Islet during his trip to beach resort town Quy Nhonin central Vietnam. 

The seaweed is used as medicine for goiter and as fertilizer.

9 photos in NatGeo that showcased Vietnam’s natural beauty

The photo featured in December captures a flock of seagulls flying around two whales just off Vung Boi-De Gi beach near Quy Nhon.

The beach is famous for its clear, blue waters.

“Mother and daughter Bryde’s whales on the coast of De Gi in Binh Dinh Province,” Viet wrote in his caption. 

Text by Hoang Phong for E.VnExpress.net

Tran Tuan Viet

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Vietnam Foodies : Pork Chả Lụa Sausage Has 19th Century Roots

Whether it is referred to as chả lụa in the central and southern parts of the country, or as giò lụa in the northern regions, this famous pork delicacy is one of the most common meat products in Vietnam. It is defiantly a Must Eat during your visit in Vietnam ! #MustSeeInVietnam Editor


Every cuisine has its staples — like tortillas in Mexico, potatoes in Russia, or sambal in Malaysia. While now ubiquitous, these foods haven’t always been an essential component of their region. Created through the Columbian exchange or other cultural intermingling, cuisine is an ever-evolving concept. In Vietnam, it’s the relics of French colonialism that fused into modern-day gastronomy. From the baguette in a banh mi to the carrots, potatoes, and asparagus vegetables consumed in the country, the influences are extensive, notes Culture Trip.

Such a French influence also intertwines with chả lụa sausage, a lean pork ham popular across the entire country. Made with only a few ingredients, the food is accessible yet takes special attention to craft. Found on Tết, or Vietnamese New Year’s dining tables in all regions, this sausage is both celebrated and eaten as an everyday staple, explains Vietnam.com. So let’s dive into chả lụa sausage — this ordinary meat is something extraordinary.

What is chả lụa?


Chả, alternatively known as giò in Northern provinces, is Vietnamese for sausage. The most popular type is chả lụa, a rendition of tubed meat with pork. Flavored with fish sauce and garlic, the sausage’s soft texture is held together with starch. To start, lean pork is pounded until in a dense paste, which is then wrapped in banana leaf and steamed. The result, esteemed for its protein content, is topped onto noodles, and soups, and is an especially popular ingredient in banh mi, explains Vietnamenu.

Owing its origins to French colonization during the 19th century, the dish combines European-influenced sausage-making methods with Vietnamese ingredients. The texture of the meat is especially important, with the wrong pulverization method resulting in an unpalatable sausage. Additionally, the paste must be tightly sealed when steamed. Vietnamese immigrants to the U.S. replace hard-to-find banana leaves with aluminum foil to ensure a proper texture, notes Lion Brand.

How to make chả lụa


In Vietnam, the sausage is rarely made at home — instead purchased from vendors. The meat is traditionally pounded in a mortar and pestle by hand for several hours, although food processors are now substituted instead. For a taste most faithful to how it’s done in Vietnam, marinate thinly sliced pork in fish sauce, then freeze for two hours. Combine the result in a food processor with more fish sauce, then add tapioca starch before rolling it out into banana leaves, notes Cuisine of Vietnam.

For a quick at-home version, opt for lean pork for textural ease. Add the meat to a stand mixer, and start the machine to soften the pork. Combine flavorings, like fish sauce, white pepper, garlic, sesame oil, and starch to thicken. Add the ingredients to the mixer, and beat until strands appear. After separating the pork into two long rolls, wrap them in a banana leaf, and tie them with twine. Boil for 45 minutes or steam for an hour, explains Sift and Simmer.

How to store and use chả lụa


Homemade chả lụa will last for around a week at room temperature, but it’s better to store it in the fridge. Premade rolls will last longer, especially if unopened — up to three or four weeks in the freezer. Well-known brands can be found in Asian groceries, particularly those with a Vietnamese specialization. Seek out rolls wrapped in banana leaves for the best flavor, and don’t forget to check the label for ingredients — some are spicy, or contain undesired additives, notes Cooking with Lane.

After procuring chả lụa, slice the ham and easily integrate it as a topping. In addition to the popular banh mi, the sausage goes well with rice rolls, banh cuon, sticky rice cakes banh day, and bun bon hue, a meaty soup similar to pho. It can even make a meal on its own when fried, and served with rice and a chili dipping sauce, notes The Ravenous Couple. The sausage’s versatility and taste highlight why chả lụa became a staple of Vietnamese cuisine. Dependable and nutritious, it makes for an easily-integrated delight.

Written by NIKITA EPHANOV For Tastingtable.com

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Vietnam 2023 – Travel Guide – Phu Quy Island

Dao Phu Quy, which means “island of riches”. This Vietnam up and coming destination is also been referred to as “the little Bali” or “Maldives” of Vietnam.) Let’s visit by reading this article …#MustSeeInVietnam Editor

As the island is quite far out, situated about 120km from Phan Thiet city in the East Sea, it has that remote, wild allure. At the moment, it’s mostly young Vietnamese travelers ‘in the know’ who visit. So this is an up-and-coming destination that’s worth visiting while it remains rather undiscovered.

Phu Quy is a small island that is big on beautiful scenery and landscapes. Blessed with beautiful beaches, coral reefs and other wonders of nature, this little slice of paradise of just 18 square kilometers is also home to many historical and cultural sites that showcase the heart of Vietnam.

When to visit

Phu Quy, also known as Thu Island or Khoai Xu Island, is about 120 kilometers southeast of the central coast city of Phan Thiet in Binh Thuan province. The island’s climate is cool all year round. 

A corner of Phu Quy Island. 

The best time to explore Phu Quy is from December to June, as the storm season usually falls from September to November. During the spring and summer seasons, the sea is calm and winds are light, so visitors can easily travel to the small island. However, travelers are always advised to check the weather forecast in advance in case of rough seas.

What to explore

Trieu Duong Bay

Trieu Duong Bay can be found off the major road that circles the island. This is a small beach with clear blue water kissing a long wide stretch of soft white sand. Locals come here in the afternoons to swim.

Clear water and smooth sand at Trieu Duong Bay.

Bai Nho Beach

Bai Nho Beach is a crescent-shaped beach, charmed by its mountain backdrop. Visitors just need to park their motorbikes on the road and follow a trail down the hill to the beach. Some of Phu Quy’s other attractive beaches include Doi Dua in Ngu Phung Commune and the beach near the district committee park.

Ganh Hang Cliff

About 650 meters from Bai Nho Beach, Ganh Hang is a large cliff above the sea. As waves crashing against the rocks have created “Khe Sung Suong” – a sea inlet, which also contains a natural “infinity pool” popular with tourists. 

Visitors should bring a sturdy pair of climbing shoes to ensure safety. When taking pictures, visitors should not go near the edge of the “infinity pool” to avoid being pulled into the sea by the waves. 

The infinity pool at Ganh Hang Cliff. Photo by Dang Doan Sang

Cao Cat Mountain

Cao Cat Mountain is on the north side of Phu Quy Island. It is one of the highest mountains on the island, 106 meters above sea level. Cao Cat features cliffs weathered with horizontal cliffs like the Grand Canyon, the U.S. On the way to Cao Cat mountain, you can visit Linh Son pagoda.

The cliffs have unique shapes due to weathering at the top of Cao Cat mountain. Photo by Pham Quoc Cuong

Van An Thanh Temple

In 1941, local people discovered and solemnly buried a whale carcass washed up on Phu Quy island. It is said that the whale was more than 20 kilometers long when it was alive. Visitors can visit the whale skeleton at Van An Thanh. Locals believe that whales protect boats during storms. 

The whale skeleton at Van An Thanh Temple. Photo by Viet Du Travel

Phu Quy Lighthouse

The lighthouse is located on Cam Mountain, 100 meters above sea level. This is one of the best locations to view the entire poetic landscape of Phu Quy. 

Phu Quy Lighthouse. Photo by Khi Pun

At the end of the road to Linh Buu Pagoda, visitors can find the road to the lighthouse. The facility is open to the public and free to enter, but visitors can donate a small amount to support the housekeeping and cleaning team. 

Temple of Princess Ban Tranh

The Temple of Princess Ban Tranh was built by the Cham people at the end of the 15th century. Legend has it that the Champa princess refused to be forced to marry, so the king exiled her to sea on a boat. The boat drifted to Phu Quy island, where she decided to stay and help the locals fight off foreign invaders. When she died, a shrine was established where an annual ceremony is still held to mark the anniversary of her death. She was then called Ba Chua Xu or Ba Chua Dao, the princess of the island.

Tomb of Master Sai Nai 

This tomb is dedicated to a Chinese doctor who dedicated his life to helping people on the island, back when it was first being settled in the modern era. He is worshiped as the island’s guardian deity. According to folklore, Master Sai Nai was a Chinese merchant who was knowledgeable about medicines. During a business trip to Vietnam, his boat was pushed to Phu Quy island by a storm. He was attracted to stay thanks to the beauty of the island. He then lived the rest of his life on Phu Quy. 

After his death in 1665, he was placed in this tomb which islanders often visit to pray for luck and a good harvest. Every year, a ceremony in the name of Sai Nai is held on the 4th day of the 4th lunar month. 

The majestic seaside Tomb of Master Sai Nai.

Wind power plant

Phu Quy is home to one of the three wind-power farms in Binh Thuan Province. Phu Quy Wind Power Plant’s turbine towers are 60 meters tall with 37-meter blades.

One of several towers at Phu Quy wind power plant. Photo by Tam Linh

Long Hai fish market

In the morning, the bustling atmosphere of the Long Hai fish market is buoyed by a constant flow of fishing boats docking. There are countless varieties of rare and prized seafood, such as heavy snails that are bigger than your hand. Prices are inexpensive and the quality is unbeatable.

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Lang Duong fish pond

The Lang Duong fish pond was built by Phu Quy locals for fishing purposes. But it’s since been abandoned and has instead become an attraction for tourists, who stop by to relax, dunk their feet in the cool and calm water or to take some unique photos.

A man pose for a photo at Lang Duong fish pond. Photo by Pham Quoc Cuong

The islets

It takes only 10 minutes by canoe from Phu Quy to visit the local islets of Hon Den, Hon Trung, Hon Giua, Hon Do and Hon Tranh, where life and sceneries are even more pristine. 

Hon Hai Islet. Photo by Duc Chinh

Hon Tranh and Hon Den islets are beautiful and safe. Canoes are available as are tours in which you can fish, do coral sightseeing, take photos, and/or have lunch at the raft house. The fish you catch can then be transferred into raw fish dishes. Tour prices cost around VND250,000 VND (US$10.60) per person, excluding lunch. Travelers can ask the hotel to contact local tour guides for more information.

And at Hon Hai islet you can learn about the origins of the famous shark fishing boats of Phu Quy island.

Diving and coral sightseeing

A woman dives near coral reefs in the waters of Phu Quy Island. 

If visitors are into underwater activities, they can rent a snorkeling boat for coral sightseeing. Beneath the clear blue water are colorful coral reefs along with all kinds of amazing fish.

What to eat

Phu Quy is known for its fast array of seafood. May is the peak season for seafood on the island. “Visitors can easily buy shrimp, crab, fish and snails at bargain prices with high quality,” said Sang, a tourism officer in Phu Quy. 

If you’re a seafood lover, you can dine on rafts via floating restaurants such as Dai Nam, Anh Sang, Hai Thien, Hai Phat and Ba Sinh. 

Phu Quy lobster is also abundant here. It has a slightly red shell color when it is alive, so the locals call it red lobster, to distinguish it from blue lobster. The easiest way to enjoy this food is to steam it, as the shell changes into a beautiful darker red after steaming. 

King crab and moon crab are two of Phu Quy’s seafood specialities. King crabs have a somewhat intimidating appearance for first-timers. However, the taste quickly transforms shy eaters into crab lovers.

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King crab (L) and moon crab on Phu Quy Island. Photos by Tam Linh

Moon crabs have dark red circles on the shell and live in crevices of coral rocks. The sweet and fragrant crab meat has a distinctive flavor that makes diners fall in love right after their first bite.

Another specialty of Phu Quy is hot beef. The “hot” is used to describe how fast the organic beef is served and sold within the day. You can find this unique dish at places such as Hoa Thuong, Ngoc Tinh, Thanh Binh, and Thu Vien restaurants.

Where to stay

Tourism on Phu Quy island is still quite new; there are no luxury resorts here. But there are plenty of comfortable accommodations. Hotels La Min, Hai Long, Hoang Phu, Phuong Quyen, An Binh and Huong Duong are all nice places, as are motels such as Nam An and An Phu.

Additionally, lovely homestays are available such as Phu Lien, Co Sang, Villa Blue Sea, LyTi Sea, and La Isla Bonita. Average prices range from VND300,000 – 500,000 (US$12.71 – 21.18) per night for two people.

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La Isla Bonita homestay looks over the sea in Phu Quy. Photos courtesy of La Isla Bonita

How to get there

As the most remote island district of Binh Thuan Province, Phu Quy Island has a wild allure and remains quite untouched by commercial tourism. The only means of getting to the island is by boat from Phan Thiet Town, which is about 110 kilometers from Phu Quy. 

From Ho Chi Minh City, you can buy a bus ticket to Phan Thiet, with a price ranging from VND150,000 to 250,000 ($6.36 – 10.60) per person for a one way ticket.

Once you arrive in Phan Thiet, you can purchase a one way boat ticket to Phu Quy, which costs VND250,000 for one person. Travelling by high-speed ship will take 2.5 hours and cost VND350,000 per person. There will be seats and beds, fan rooms and air-conditioned rooms provided in these ships. 

The ship services going to Phu Quy include Superdong and Phu Quy Express. The ships usually depart from Phan Thiet at about 6:30 to 7:30 in the morning. Depending on the day, there can be an earlier trip at 5:30 in the morning or a latest trip at 3 in the afternoon.

It is noted that visitors should book in advance because tickets sell out very quickly. You can track more ship schedules at the information page of Binh Thuan Department of Transport in the announcement section. 

Visitors with a history of motion sickness should take medicine and prepare plastic bags because traveling at sea is quite tough. 

There are no taxis on the island, but you can rent a motorbike at your own hotel. Renting a motorbike on the island costs around VND100,000 – 120,000 ($4.24 – 5.08) per day. 

Sunset on Phu Quy Island.

Written by Linh Sea for E.VnExpress.net – Photos by Linh Sea, Tinh Phu Quy

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2023 Vietnam Landscape Series : Northern Vietnam tea hills mist over as winter begins

Mother Nature favored Vietnam. Let’s start the year by visiting a northern region that stands out with its beauty that passes through the seasons. #MustSeeInVietnam Editor

Tea hills in the northern provinces of Phu Tho, Mai Chau and Sa Pa are at their best at this time of the year under a blanket of mist. 

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

Farmers wearing non la (Vietnamese conical hats) pick tea leaves at Long Coc in Phu Tho Province, around 112 kilometers from Hanoi.

Tea farming is an important occupation in Phu Tho and the main source of income for many locals. A typical tea plantation in the hills of Long Coc measures around a hectare. 

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

In early winter the tea hills are shrouded in thick fog in the mornings, and the sight attracts both amateur and professional photographers. 

Long Coc teems with green tea hills that are compared with the islets in Ha Long Bay, the UNESCO world heritage site in northern Vietnam, where limestone islets and pillars jut out of a bay.

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

Long Coc at night when the sky is full of stars.

As the Long Coc tea hills start rising on the tourism map, so do local accommodation services. The mainly Tay ethnic local population offers homestays for tourists seeking to stay overnight. 

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

Situated at an altitude of 1,054 meters above sea level, Moc Chau in the northern Son La Province has a temperate climate with temperatures ranging between 15 and 26 degrees Celsius through the year.

It has around 1,800 ha of tea estates, which make it the country’s largest tea producer.

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

The tea harvest season lasts from April to December.

Every day farmers gather at the tea factory at around 7 a.m. and then flock to the hills to pick tea buds.

In recent years local authorities have started turning the tea hills in Moc Chau into eco-tourism sites.

Bikes and motorbikes are available on rent for visitors to explore the tea hills and traditional stilt houses of the ethnic minority communities.

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

Tea hills in Moc Chau shrouded in mist. 

Moc Chau, which is around 200 kilometers from Hanoi, can be reached easily by car or bus.

Its rising popularity as a tourist destination has seen the rapid development of homestays.

Some budget places are MAMA’s House, Le Chalet du Lac, Fairy House Moc Chau, House By Lake, The Nordic Village, and Moc Chau Retreat, and they cost VND300,000 to 1 million ($12-40.20) a night.

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

A lonely house in the middle of tea hills in Moc Chau blanketed by mist. 

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

O Long tea hill, situated 8 km from Sa Pa Town and nearly 400 km from Hanoi, spreads over an area of 200 hectares. 

It is a tourist magnet at this time of the year when its cherry trees are in full bloom.

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

Visitors are requested not to litter, damage the tea trees or pick the flowers.

Northern tea hills mist over as winter begins

Pink cherry blossoms dazzle as the sun shines on the tea hills along National Highway 4D leading to O Quy Ho Mountain Pass, around 15 kilometers from Sa Pa.

Sa Pa is also well-known for many other attractions like Mount Fansipan, nicknamed “roof of Indochina,” terraced rice fields, Muong Hoa Valley, and a Gothic stone church at its center.

Written By Huynh Phuong, Tran Linh


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Vietnam and the World ring in 2023 !

I think we were all very excited to start 2023! Happy New Year from the whole team of Must See In Vietnam … …and carry on the tradition of the first kiss for the new year! Your Editor

People from all around the globe launched fireworks and other events to celebrate the end of 2022 and the herald of 2023.

The big crowd on Nguyen Hue Street in Saigon. Photo by Giang Anh
People stand in front of a stage for the countdown party in HCMC’s Nguyen Hue walking street. Photo by VnExpress/Thanh Tung
New Year Firework in Saigon

Travelers stop on Thu Thiem Bridge in HCMC minutes before the midnight fireworks explode. Photo by Gia Minh

World celebrates New Year's Eve as 2023 begins

The ‘family fireworks’, which take place three hours before midnight every year ahead of the main show at midnight, fill the sky over the Opera House in Sydney, Australia on New Year’s Eve. Photo by AFP/David Gray

World celebrates New Year's Eve as 2023 begins

People gather at the sea promenade, lit up during sunset on New Year’s Eve in Mumbai, India. Photo by AFP/Punit Paranjpe

World celebrates New Year's Eve as 2023 begins

People release balloons as they take part in new year celebrations in Tokyo, Japan.Photo by Reuters/Issei Kato

World celebrates New Year's Eve as 2023 begins

People gather to take part in New Year celebrations at a public park in Yangon, Myanmar. Photo by AFP/Sai Aung Main

World celebrates New Year's Eve as 2023 begins

New Year’s eve celebrations in central Seoul, South Korea. Photo by Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji

World celebrates New Year's Eve as 2023 begins

The sun sets behind Wat Arun or the temple of dawn on New Year’s Eve in Bangkok, Thailand. Photo by Reuters/Athit Perawongmetha

World celebrates New Year's Eve as 2023 begins

People hold balloons as they gather to celebrate NewYear’s Eve, amid the coronavirus disease outbreak, in Wuhan, Hubei province, China. Photo by Reuters/Tingshu Wang

Must See In Vietnam Team … in 2023 !


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10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam for ending well 2022

Time doesn’t stand still…sometimes we wish it did – luckily it’s out of our control! 2022 has been another year filled with emotions! Another sporting year during which thrill seekers were well served! Right here in Saigon we are in countdown mode and in preparation mode to end 2022 well and start like Lions 2023! Today’s article is on point because celebrating is eating and drinking well with families and friends ! #MustSeeInVietnam Editor

Check out this list of 10 Vietnamese bars and restaurants – mostly in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City – that received rave reviews from international travel magazines this year. 

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

In July, Rice Market Restaurant at Regent Phu Quoc Resort on the southern island Phu Quoc was voted among the best new Vietnamese establishments by U.S. magazine Travel + Leisure.

The restaurant serves iconic Vietnamese dishes like pho (pictured) and rice paper rolls, alongside Chinese classics like dim sum, char siu fried pork rice and Beijing-style roasted duck.

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

The fine dining Vietage restaurant, which serves train passengers along the Da Nang-Quy Nhon line was also praised by Travel + Leisure.

The restaurant offers foie gras with local farm-to-table onions from Ly Son Island off the Da Nang coast. The dining car’s freshly cracked black pepper comes from Phu Quoc and the eatery’s signature seafood salad and fish sauce are both made with ingredients sourced fresh from the local waters off the picturesque beaches of Quy Nhon.

Launched by Anantara Hotels in 2020, the luxurious six-hour train route carries no more than 12 passengers and runs through popular tourist hotspots in Da Nang, Hoi An, Quang Ngai and Quy Nhon.

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

The gourmet Chinese restaurant Kabin in HCMC was the only Vietnamese gastronomic experience on TripAdvisor’s list of Asia’s 25 Best Fine Dining Restaurants released in September this year. 

Located on the second floor of the Renaissance Riverside Hotel in downtown HCMC, the restaurant ranked 24th on the 2022 annual Tripadvisor Travelers’ Choice Best of the Best Awards, which are decided by an algorithm that analyzes millions of reviews and ratings collected annually from travelers around the world.

Its signature dishes include steamed fresh prawn dumplings, deep fried prawns with salted egg yolk, and Peking duck (pictured).

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

In November, American magazine Condé Nast Traveler lauded A Ban Mountain Dew on Tran Phu Street in Ba Dinh District as among the four best new restaurants in Hanoi. 

The owner is a native of Lang Son Province, and thus the restaurant specializes in dishes from the northern mountainous hinterlands of Vietnam. 

The interior décor takes its inspiration from ethnic minority cultures in Vietnam’s northern highlands, including images of rice terraces, village streams and clouds embracing mountain peaks.

The restaurant’s menu includes xoi ngu sac (five-color sticky rice), grilled meat, com lam (sticky rice cooked in a bamboo tube), hotpots, as well as new fusions such as pizza topped with bamboo worms.

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

Condé Nast Traveler readers also voted Chapter Dining & Grill Hanoi as one of the best fine dining restaurants in the capital.

The restaurant opened earlier this year on Chan Cam Street in Hoan Kiem District and specializes in rare delicacies such as raw prawns, Wagyu beef tartare, raw oysters and unique mushroom dishes.

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

In May, Stir Bar in Ho Chi Minh City was the only Vietnamese representative on the William Reed Business Media 2022 Asia’s 50 Best Bar List.

Located on Le Thanh Ton Street in District 1, the bar stays open till 2 a.m. and has small and cozy nooks for couples.

The bar offers a wide range of classic cocktails prepared by famed award-winning mixologists. Stir bartenders won big awards in 2019, including the “World Class Vietnam 2019 Mixology Champion” prize and the “World Cocktail Battle 2019 Champion” award.

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

In November, Kuusi by Tung on Quang Trung Street in Hanoi’s Hoan Kiem District was also named one of the bets new bars by American readers of Condé Nast Traveler.

This exclusive venue offers just 12 seats. 

Guests are treated with a two-hour cocktail experience of five drinks paired with a series of gastronomic snacks created by Chef Tung and his team.

The first floor has six seats with snuggly-placed highchairs while the mezzanine area offers a sofa for four people.

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

Condé Nast Traveler readers also selected The Haflington on Hang Ma Street in Hanoi’s Old Quarter as one of the best new bars in Vietnam.

Designed as a private museum with typical European architecture, the bar showcases rows of glass vitrines and a whiskey tasting counter with an adjoining club-style smoking lounge.

The two-story bar’s main floor offers a comfortable space for guests to sit and hang out together while the basement is designated for those seeking privacy.

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

Trieu Institute on Mac Thi Buoi Street in Ho Chi Minh City’s District 1 was another watering hole voted by Condé Nast Traveler readers one of the best in Vietnam’s major southern metropolis.

The bar’s design takes its inspiration from its eponymous heroine Ba Trieu, a third-century warrior that repelled invaders from the China’s Eastern Wu Dynasty.

Trieu’s balcony allows guests to watch the bustling Saigon nightlife below.

In addition to serving cocktails, the bar also offers cuisine such as grilled octopus and Black Angus steak.

Critics’ 10 favorite bars & restaurants in Vietnam

Phantom of The Opera on Ho Chi Minh City’s Hai Ba Trung Street was another American reader favorite in 2022.

It’s central location adjacent to Nguyen Hue Pedestrian Boulevard just behind the Saigon Opera House used to be the city’s largest opium factory.

The interior is decorated with rows of dressing room lights and shimmering glass cupboards of alcohols and elixirs.

The bar is open from 6 p.m. until 2 a.m.

Written by Hoang Phong Photos courtesy of the bars and restaurants


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10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

What could be better than posting a list of 10 places that earned international honors on this last Friday of 2022. This article might just tip Vietnam for your next trip! Good reading ! #MustSeeInVietnam Editor

After Vietnam reopened international tourism, Vietnamese tourist hotspots continued to garner praise from the international media, with some winning global recognition for the first time.

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

In January, the New York Times included the Red River Delta in its annual list of the 52 best places to travel in 2022.

The Red River Delta, spanning some 15,000 square kilometers, consists of eight provinces and two centrally-managed cities Hanoi and Hai Phong, with a population of over 23 million.

The delta is the cradle of quan ho folk singing, recognized by UNESCO as an intangible cultural heritage of humanity in 2010, and home to the Tam Chuc Pagoda complex (pictured) said to be the world’s biggest pagoda. 

“Since ancient times, villagers along the Cau River in northern Vietnam have sung Quan ho, a call-and-response folk music style performed by alternating all-female and all-male duets from neighboring villages that was recognized as a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage practice in 2009,” New York Times added. Photo by Giang Huy

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

In February, the ancient town of Hoi An made it on to a list of 10 most welcoming cities on Earth, endorsed by readers of the online travel booking agency Booking.com. 

The ranking is based on analysis of more than 232 million verified traveler reviews made on the Dutch-based travel booking website. These are the destinations that have an above-average number of properties with exceptional reviews for friendly hospitality.

Lying along Thu Bon River, Hoi An boasts a unique architectural style that features traditional structures with yellow walls and red-tile roofs.

The town has pedestrian-friendly streets as motorbikes and cars are banned from the town center for large parts of the day – from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Photo by Dac Thanh

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

In March, the resort town of Da Lat in the Central Highlands was named by Booking.com one of the world’s 10 best places to view flowers.

Situated on a plateau around 1,500 meters above sea level, Da Lat enjoys year-round cool weather that stands in contrast to Vietnam’s tropical climate.

The highlands town is one of Vietnam’s biggest flower-growing regions, producing around three billion flowers every year, 10% of which are exported to markets including Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Australia and mainland China.

Its annual flower festival is considered the largest in the Central Highlands region. Photo by Nguyen Hieu

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

In May, the 632-meter-long glass bridge in Moc Chau in the northern province of Son La was recognized by Guinness as the world’s longest glass bridge.

With this official recognition, the bridge has unseated the 530-meter-long glass bridge in China’s Guangdong Province, which was recognized by Guinness as the world’s longest in 2020.

Inaugurated on April 30 this year, the Moc Chau glass bridge is suspended some 150 meters above a lush green jungle valley. Photo by Ngoc Thanh

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

In July, New York-based travel magazine Thrillist listed Lan Ha Bay in the northern city of Hai Phong among the “most beautiful places” to visit in Southeast Asia.

Located to the east of Cat Ba Island, around two hours from Hanoi, the 7,000-hectare bay boasts around 400 islands, all of them covered with trees and other vegetation.

One of the biggest highlights in Lan Ha Bay is Cai Beo fishing village, believed to be the oldest of its kind in Vietnam and considered a living museum of Vietnamese fishing culture.

The floating village, with around 300 households, features dozens of houses that float on green clear waters. Photo by Pham Huy Trung

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

In August, CNN selected the capital city Hanoi in its list of 12 best places in the world to travel to in the fall. 

The American news channel suggested tourists try a motorbike tour through the Old Quarter that is dotted with ancient houses, French colonial buildings, cafes and food stalls.

Hanoi has long been a favorite autumn escape among foreign tourists who love riding bicycles along the narrow streets covered with fallen yellow leaves, or taking photos of women wearing ao dai, Vietnam’s beautiful national costume. Photo by Tung Dinh

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

In November, Tam Dao, a popular retreat built by the French in the northern province of Vinh Phuc, was voted the world’s leading tourist town for the first time in the 2022 World Travel Awards.

Around 90 kilometers northeast of Hanoi, Tam Dao, or “three islands” in Vietnamese, used to be a favored summer retreat of French officials in the late 19th century thanks to its year-round cool climate and foggy landscape.

Dotted with French-built villas and decades-old hotels, Tam Dao has become a popular weekend escape for Hanoians in recent years. Photo by Viet Dinh

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

Phu Quocwhich lays off the southern province of Kien Giang, was named the world’s leading nature island destination for the first time at this year’s World Travel Awards. 

Covering an area of 567 square kilometers and home to 180,000 people, Phu Quoc is the largest island in Vietnam and the nation’s first island city.

Well known for its long, sandy beaches with turquoise waters and dense forests, Phu Quoc has become a popular holiday destination for both domestic and international tourists.

The island is also home to a marine sanctuary and a national park famous for trekking. Photo by Huu Khoa

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

In November British magazine Time Out listed Ninh Binh, where Hollywood movie “Kong: Skull Island” was shot in 2016, as one of five underrated travel destinations in Southeast Asia.

Situated some two hours to the east of Hanoi, Ninh Binh was home to the ancient capital of Hoa Lu during the reign of the Dinh Dynasty (968-980), but has not been on tourists’ radar for years.

It is home to UNESCO-listed Trang An Landscape Complex (pictured), Van Long Nature Reserve and Tam Coc, famous for boat tours through golden yellow rice paddies. Photo by Shutterstock

10 Vietnam tourist attractions earn global spotlight in 2022

In November, Canadian travel magazine The Travel listed Sa Pa in Vietnam’s northern highlands as one of 10 most ideal places in Asia to see snow this winter. 

Located at an altitude of over 1,500 meters above sea level in Vietnam’s northwest mountains, Sa Pa is one of the rarest places in Vietnam where visitors can see white snow during the winter.

The winter season in Sa Pa lasts from December to February, when temperatures can plunge below zero, the landscape takes on a completely different look and there is the chance of seeing snow and ice on mountain peaks. Photo by Nguyen Van Thi

Written by Huang Vu for E.VnExpress.net


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